Blitzortung Detector
#1
Hello

Detector hardware arrived today. Assembly will start next week.

I wonder if anyone has some tips for minimum-trouble assembly, do's and dont's ?

I am reasonably experienced with electronics but being at an age over 60 years, there can be challenges Smile

Any advice English/German is welcome.

Dieter in Melbourne, Australia
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#2
Hello,

The assembly is quite straightforward because there is only through hole components.

I would advise to process by component height. The smallest first.

Pay attention on transformers. Align the withe dot with the mark on the PCB. This is the same for the LP filter if you have that option.
And sure the polarity of the LEDs if you have taken the housing option.

Feel free to ask if you need help Wink
Clément
Stations: 252, 680, 733, 1440
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#3
The PDF instructions has a lot great tips, such as figuring out how long the LED leads should be.

http://en.blitzortung.org/Compendium/Doc...B_20_1.pdf

Be sure to align anything that has a pin 1 or is polarized properly.

When soldering the RF connectors, only solder the center pin, then check alignment.

If you are happy with alignment, then solder the outer pins.

Similar thing with RJ-45 connectors and the 4 pin chokes. Solder one pin, check you are happy, solder far pin, check you are happy, then you can solder the rest.

If you are not happy you can easily remelt the solder on a single pin and adjust, but with all the pins are soldered you can not.

If you do the optional low pass filters or anything SMD be sure to have flux pen, otherwise not needed.
Kevin McCormick KB0UOI
Macomb, IL USA
Stations: 1539
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#4
(2017-06-10, 08:47)DelandeC Wrote: Hello,

The assembly is quite straightforward because there is only through hole components.

I would advise to process by component height. The smallest first.

Pay attention on transformers. Align the withe dot with the mark on the PCB. This is the same for the LP filter if you have that option.
And sure the polarity of the LEDs if you have taken the housing option.

Feel free to ask if you need help Wink

Hi Clemande
Thanks for your reply. Good to hear that assembly is straightforward. I saw the online documentation and got a bit worried.
Your advice is very good. I'll copy it into a document.
I'll ask if more help is needed.
regards
Dieter
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#5
(2017-06-11, 02:57)kevinmcc Wrote: The PDF instructions has a lot great tips, such as figuring out how long the LED leads should be.

http://en.blitzortung.org/Compendium/Doc...B_20_1.pdf

Be sure to align anything that has a pin 1 or is polarized properly.

When soldering the RF connectors, only solder the center pin, then check alignment.

If you are happy with alignment, then solder the outer pins.

Similar thing with RJ-45 connectors and the 4 pin chokes. Solder one pin, check you are happy, solder far pin, check you are happy, then you can solder the rest.

If you are not happy you can easily remelt the solder on a single pin and adjust, but with all the pins are soldered you can not.

If you do the optional low pass filters or anything SMD be sure to have flux pen, otherwise not needed.

Hi Kevin
Much appreciated. Somehow I missed the documentation in pdf format. I only saw the webpage document and got a bit confused about the different versions.
I understand your advice and will copy it into a document.
regards
Dieter
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#6
For the two F-type E-field sockets and the SMA GPS one one you need a fairly powerful iron and largish bit. They are large lumps of metal and sink a lot of heat quite quickly. The RJ45 cans aren't quite as bad.
Cheers
Dave.

Stations: 1627
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#7
(2017-06-11, 20:03)allsorts Wrote: For the two F-type E-field sockets and the SMA GPS one one you need a fairly powerful iron and largish bit. They are large lumps of metal and sink a lot of heat quite quickly. The RJ45 cans aren't quite as bad.

I agree with this advice. I built three detectors. After the first SMA connector I went for my 300W gun so I could get in there quickly to solder each ground leg. Using a small iron would require too much time resulting in a lot of heat conducting farther onto the board. The result was a better joint with less risk of damage. 

Tim
Stations: 1734, 1742, 1743
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#8
If you need a good iron for not a ton of money, I recommend the Hakko FX-888D. Has been a great iron for me, and handles the F and SMA connectors like a champ.

Use high heat and move quickly, the parts then won't get excessively hot.
Kevin McCormick KB0UOI
Macomb, IL USA
Stations: 1539
Reply
#9
Hakko FX-888D <FX: google> around GBP120 on a amazon.co.uk , that's moderately expensive. I treated myself to a chinese "Tenma" from CPC (http://cpc.farnell.com/tenma/21-10115-uk...dp/SD01738), for GBP44.39 (on offer, now listed at GBP46.79). 60W, ESD safe, does the business. The same soldering station is available from other places but for about GBP20 more...
Cheers
Dave.

Stations: 1627
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