direct connection requirement
#1
I notice in the information given about setting up a station, that "direct" connection to the internet is specified. I would take this to mean an Ethernet connection. Since I don't have that capability, can I get by with a USB connection to my wifi connected PC?
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#2
If you have (good) wifi around, you dont need a direct connection. I use a ethernet to wifi adapter. This one.., but are are many more.
You put the cable in the adapter, which connects directly to my router.. Works great, but is less stable then direct connection..
Stations: 752
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#3
I use and old Linksys WRT54G and dd-wrt firmware - works great
Stations: 584, 585, 2017
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#4
I have my system setup in a spare room that doesnt have any direct cable internet connection, so have a WiFi device setup in station mode. This device communicates to the main Wifi router in another room, and provides a single internet cable outlet that connects direct to the System Red Controller. (This room also seems to have less EMI noise, and has better view of the GPS satellites.! )

I am using a Ubiquiti Picostation for this, see http://www.ubnt.com/airmax/picostationm/. It seems to work well and is transparent in Blitzortung setup. The main WiFi router is an Asus RT-N66, and no special settings are required. A Picostation may be a bit of an overkill for this, and you can probably find cheaper options, or rework some old router equipment to achieve the same setup (which I assume is what RichoAnd has done).
Stations: 1113
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#5
Thank you all for the information. That's one hurdle cleared!
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#6
Has anyone tried using satellite internet? I was thinking of putting one up at a field station in a national park (Capitol Reef, in southern Utah) , but they only have internet access via satellite. I'm guessing the delay in transmission will disqualify the data it might send. And the bandwidth might be a problem. We are already sending weather data and webcam on the link.
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#7
(2014-08-26, 13:38)b.e.wilson Wrote: Has anyone tried using satellite internet? I was thinking of putting one up at a field station in a national park (Capitol Reef, in southern Utah) , but they only have internet access via satellite. I'm guessing the delay in transmission will disqualify the data it might send. And the bandwidth might be a problem. We are already sending weather data and webcam on the link.

While all data is GPS time stamped, I'd also be interested in knowing what the acceptable delay is in reporting. I assume the servers only wait for so long before running calculations on the data received for a given strike.
Stations: 1013
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#8
(2014-08-26, 13:38)b.e.wilson Wrote: Has anyone tried using satellite internet? I was thinking of putting one up at a field station in a national park (Capitol Reef, in southern Utah) , but they only have internet access via satellite. I'm guessing the delay in transmission will disqualify the data it might send. And the bandwidth might be a problem. We are already sending weather data and webcam on the link.
Up to 1500ms latency could be an issue, as you are aware....
But then, it's time for developers to step in... this may be something they've considered and who knows what lurks deep in the hearts of the algorithms.... I don't see it effecting the GPS timestamps... just transmission to the server... Huh

Mike
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#9
(2014-08-26, 15:14)Cutty Wrote: Up to 1500ms latency could be an issue, as you are aware....

There is also something I've observed working down there: sometimes when you first establish an internet connection there is a considerable delay, maybe 5-10 seconds, in making a connection through the satellite. I don't know the cause, nor have I tested whether it continues for repeated data transfers or how long you must go with no data before the connection is "dropped" and require reconnection for the next data packet.

I've also asked out field station manager if there are any plans for a faster/more consistent connection down there.

I'm interested in a receiver there because it's extraordinarily quiet there; no light, no radio, nothing but nature...and the occasional car passing on a dirt road. And all the electricity you could use--solar, so there might be some inverter noise I'd need to work around.
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#10
As I suggested on WxForum, maybe you can take the Orem build down there for a few days, and see what happens... you will transmit several megabytes daily...
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#11
I'm happy to report that plans are underway to bring full direct connectivity to the Station. Now I need permission and funds from the University to buy the kits.
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