Dielectric grease
#1
Most of the frequencies used here are lower, and the commercial dielectric grease seems to have little or no effect from DC on up to even UHF ham bands.

But what about using the stuff on the GPS antenna connections, especially for those of us with the need to add in an extension cable?

Does the signal in the GPS antenna to the chip path have enough difference that one should be careful about the application of the protective grease? 

In general I'm impressed about how well the stuff does help in humid environments.

Dale
Stations: 976, 1505
Reply
#2
Silicone dielectric grease is your friend. It prevents corrosion from water or condensation inside connectors. It does not affect any frequency from DC to microwaves.

Get the clear stuff, that is non-hardening.
Regards,
Mike W.
Station information
Stations: 1977
Reply
#3
I would slide a big enough heat shrink tubing over the cable, screw the connectors together, then apply the grease over the outside. Then shrink the tubing. Makes for a water and airtight seal. No moisture and air = no corrosion.
Station: 2100
Stations: 2100
Reply
#4
(2018-01-30, 19:37)dupreezd Wrote: I would slide a big enough heat shrink tubing over the cable, screw the connectors together, then apply the grease over the outside. Then shrink the tubing. Makes for a water and airtight seal. No moisture and air = no corrosion.

Heat shrink is fine, but put the grease on the inside of the connector. That's where it is needed!

We have done this for over 30 years, and have opened up connectors that were filled with it and outdoors for 20 years. When unscrewing them after all that time, there was absolutely no corrosion. Even the silver was still bright white.

There was electrical tape stretch-wrapped over it all, and other splices covered with tape but without the grease inside were corroded and the silver badly tarnished from condensation.
Regards,
Mike W.
Station information
Stations: 1977
Reply
#5
Grease is messy...

Electrical insulating tape stretched or otherwise won't keep the damp out, even good quality stuff.

For something that works and isn't messy use self amalgamating tape. I've had connectors outside exposed to sunlight and the weather for periods of 10 years or more. When I removed that installtion and opened up the connectors they where exactly as I installed them and not covered in grease. B-) You just wrap the joint/connectors from the outer jacket of one cable to the outer jacket of the other and back again overlapping each turn and stretching the tape as you go. It quickly forms a solid "rubber" covering.
Cheers
Dave.

Stations: 1627
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)