Blue Board L104 C605 Detached
#1
Brand new System Blue just received. I parted the PCB boards and filed the nubs when L104 fell off. C605, right next to L104, has a cracked joint and tombstoned up when I touched it.

How should I proceed? I don't mind trying to rework board but all I have is lead-based solder. Is this indicative of faulty board which will continue to give me trouble?


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#2
To clarify, the board was handled gently since I received it. I am positive these flaws were present when shipped.
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#3
(2019-08-28, 22:03)bretberger Wrote: Brand new System Blue just received. I parted the PCB boards and filed the nubs when L104 fell off. C605, right next to L104, has a cracked joint and tombstoned up when I touched it.

How should I proceed? I don't mind trying to rework board but all I have is lead-based solder. Is this indicative of faulty board which will continue to give me trouble?

Dont't worry about the lead-based solder. Go ahead and solder away.
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#4
(2019-08-28, 23:55)dupreezd Wrote:
(2019-08-28, 22:03)bretberger Wrote: Brand new System Blue just received. I parted the PCB boards and filed the nubs when L104 fell off. C605, right next to L104, has a cracked joint and tombstoned up when I touched it.

How should I proceed? I don't mind trying to rework board but all I have is lead-based solder. Is this indicative of faulty board which will continue to give me trouble?

Dont't worry about the lead-based solder. Go ahead and solder away.

Agreed. In the "olden days" of surface mount, silver-bearing solder was used (to prevent damage to the SMD device). But today's surface-mount devices are more rugged.

Just be sure to first heat the end of C65 that is still attached and gently bring it down flush with the board while the solder is molten.
Regards,
Mike W.
Stations: 1977, 2294
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#5
Thanks guys. Took my fine tipped iron and got them tacked down.
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#6
Lead free solder is a regulatory thing for commercial manufactures.

Most repair techs use lead solder, just better to use.
Kevin McCormick KB0UOI
Macomb, IL USA
Stations: 1539
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#7
(2019-08-30, 03:44)kevinmcc Wrote: Lead free solder is a regulatory thing for commercial manufactures.

Most repair techs use lead solder, just better to use.

We switched to lead free where I work almost a decade ago, these days I only ever use tin/lead if I am working on valve equipment.
Once you get used to it the modern lead free solder is just as easy to use as tin/lead and a lot less toxic!
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#8
(2019-09-02, 19:26)Benedict.Smith Wrote:
(2019-08-30, 03:44)kevinmcc Wrote: Lead free solder is a regulatory thing for commercial manufactures.

Most repair techs use lead solder, just better to use.

We switched to lead free where I work almost a decade ago, these days I only ever use tin/lead if I am working on valve equipment.
Once you get used to it the modern lead free solder is just as easy to use as tin/lead and a lot less toxic!

I agree. I use a temperature-controlled iron and SnCuAg solder. The small amount of silver lowers the melting temperature and prevents tin whiskers.

But 60/40  or 63/37 leaded solder flows and wets better than the above.
Regards,
Mike W.
Stations: 1977, 2294
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