Blue system antenna
#1
Hi everybody


The blue kit works with only two ferrite antennas?
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#2
Yes,Yes Smile
Stations: 584, 585, 2017
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#3
(2016-05-10, 10:47)RichoAnd Wrote: Yes,Yes            Smile

I have seen three antennas in some blue projects, so i thought it only work with three antennas. Thank you Smile
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#4
If used with two, don't connect them to channel C.
Clément
Stations: 252, 680, 733, 1440
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#5
(2016-05-10, 15:49)DelandeC Wrote: If used with two, don't connect them to channel C.

Thank you Smile
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#6
No drawbacks.
Just that one component of the magnetic field won't be use. But this not a problem. Wink
Clément
Stations: 252, 680, 733, 1440
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#7
i have a general question about the systems antennas,
today i watched live the thunder over germany as i saw long range green lines. well

i didnt know lf signals could travel that fast so far but norway... hello....
if i see that, i think the antenna has alot of options to be cheaper smaller in size...

does the system realy need stations from norway or Greek point thunderstrikes in Germany?

shouldent we instead of make the antenna bigger go the other way and build it smaller cheaper an without this range

well i i know the single one station in Japan would be happy we could give him some hits in his region but i think thats to far for the actual antenna...
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#8
(2016-06-03, 19:54)starlord Wrote: i have a general question about the systems antennas,
today i watched live the thunder over germany as i saw long range green lines. well

i didnt know lf signals could travel that fast so far but norway... hello....
if i see that, i think the antenna has alot of options to be cheaper smaller in size...

does the system realy need stations from norway or Greek point thunderstrikes in Germany?

shouldent we instead of make the antenna bigger go the other way and build it smaller cheaper an without this range

well i i know the single one station in Japan would be happy we could give him some hits in his region but i think thats to far for the actual antenna...

Having the possibility to detect lightning strikes far away is useful for locations where the station density is minimal, compared to Central Europe where the station density is already sufficient.

I'm not completely sure what you meant by "if signals could travel that fast so far but norway", but the field disturbances propagate at the speed of light and such they would take only about 7ms or 0.007s to reach the northernmost station in Norway from the southern parts of Germany. That's a negligible delay compared to the system's delay which is around 1200-15000ms depending on the load. Norway isn't actually that far from Germany, I've seen stations in northern Finland pick up lightning strikes in Spain.

My bet is that the server picks which stations it uses for the calculation so that they are as evenly spread out on a circle as possible. In that case, a station further away is just as useful as a station closer to the location of the lightning strike.
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#9
yes but that means, the anntennas could be much much smaller for the short range stations, in Germany as example...
smaller antenna = easyer to install cheaper because lesser material...

yes ur right for the stations like japan the long range is important, but iam in a Region were iam well sourunded by stations,
i dont think my station will add much pluss for this far region guys, because there are hundrets of people between me and them..
because my place is in the middle of all the others, the next 3 antennas are 40-80km away....
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#10
(2016-06-05, 22:37)starlord Wrote: because my place is in the middle of all the others, the next 3 antennas are 40-80km away....

Perfect!  If this was a perfect network, stations would be at that density!  The more, the better!

and you want the lowest signal to noise ratio you can get... so antenna sizes vrs gain and threshold levels is a compromise.
 
The way a lot of us Americas folks built our ferrite antennas, the materials cost difference between a 200mm  and a 300mm  with 7.5mm ferrite core slugs
is less than $2 U.S.  ... a 300 mm materials about  $6 US, depending on how you got your shrink tubing and wire!
We have an American Surplus Parts source where we get 50mm X 7.5mm rods (33 material) for about $0.70 each US depending on quantity + shipping.
You'll see them at many stations in Region 3.  But shipping will be very expensive out of U.S.
The expense isn't really in the materials in this case... but in the time it can take to build.

And wire or coaxial loops probably are even cheaper. 

Now, if you're not building your own antennas... the cost for the Friese ferrite antennas from Blitzortung is quite fair. Very fair.
And the Friese antennas are standardized, so the server knows what delays to expect from a station using those.

Stations: 689, 791, 1439
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#11
(2016-06-05, 22:37)starlord Wrote: yes but that means, the anntennas could be much much smaller for the short range stations, in Germany as example...
smaller antenna = easyer to install cheaper because lesser material...

You are completely right. In such high density regions you can use a simple E-field antenna or small H-field ferrites or loops.
Stations: 538, 672, 1534, 1555, 1696, 1712, 2034, 2219
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